Tag Archives: MNR

Mozambique – police seize guns from Renamo HQ and Dhlakama home

BBC

Afonso Dhlakama (C) speaks during an interview on October 11, 2014 in Maputo, MozambiqueAFP Mr Dhlakama is based in the remote Gorongosa mountains

Police in Mozambique say they have seized 47 weapons from the headquarters of the main opposition party, and the home of its leader, Afonso Dhlakama.

The weapons, which included AK-47 rifles, were used in violent crimes in the capital, Maputo, police alleged.

Mr Dhlakama’s Renamo party condemned the raids as an “invasion”.

Renamo fighters and government forces have been involved in clashes since disputed elections in 2014, raising fears that a civil war could resume.

The 17-year conflict ended in 1992 with a peace deal which led to the former rebel group turning into an opposition party.

Mr Dhlakama was not at his Maputo home during the police raid, reports the BBC’s Jose Tembe from the city.

Fighters of former Mozambican rebel movement 'Renamo' receive military training on November 8, 2012 in Gorongosa's mountains, MozambiqueAFP Some Renamo fighters remain armed, despite a peace deal

He is based in the remote Gorongosa mountains in central Mozambique, which was his headquarters when he was a rebel leader.

Police commander Julio Jane said military uniforms and communication equipment had also been seized during the raids.

“At Mr Dhlakama’s house, we found 38 AK-47 rifles and seven pistols,” he said.

For its part, Renamo accused police of “stealing” about $4,000 (£2,800) from its properties during the operation.

Mr Dhlakama would respond “politically” to the raids, it added.

Renamo has carried out a spate of attacks on civilians and government targets since the disputed election, as it insists on the right to govern six of Mozambique’s 10 provinces.

Clashes drive Mozambicans to seek safety in Malawi

UNHCR

© UNHCR/M. Mapila
Refugees from Mozambique shortly after arrival in Kapise, Malawi.

GENEVA, Jan 15 (UNHCR) The UN Refugee Agency cautions that the number of people fleeing Mozambique and seeking asylum in Malawi has increased significantly over the last few weeks, following clashes between government forces and the opposition Mozambican National Resistance, or RENAMO.

In the village of Kapise, Mwanza district some 100 kilometres south of the country’s capital Lilongwe, UNHCR registration teams have recorded the arrival of 1,297 people, two thirds of them women and children, with over 900 people awaiting registration. Another 400 new arrivals have been reported in 16 villages located further south in the district of Chikwawa.

“UNHCR is working with the government to coordinate the response to assist these newly arrived refugees,” UNHCR spokesperson Karin de Gruijl told reporters at a news briefing in Geneva on Friday (January 15).

The Mozambicans, who mainly originate from Tete province, have told UNHCR and local authorities that they fled fighting between opposition RENAMO and government forces, de Gruijl said. Refugee women told a UNHCR protection officer how their homes were burned down with one grandmother left inside to die.

“They say that government forces are attacking villages believed to be harbouring opposition members,” de Gruijl noted, cautioning that UNHCR had not been able to confirm the accuracy of these allegations. “Some parents also stated they have been separated from their children during flight and they have not been able to find them,” she added.

In mid-2015, UNHCR and the government of Malawi recorded some 700 arrivals from Mozambique in the same area. UNHCR provided relief items, such as blankets, tents, domestic items and agricultural tools. Agreements were made with the national and local authorities for the refugees to be hosted in local communities as it was believed at that time the situation would be temporary. In the past few weeks, however the situation has changed with more and more people crossing into Malawi.

The Refugee Agency assists the government with the registration of new arrivals and the provision of tents, as well as domestic utensils, mattresses and other basic relief items. The World Food Programme is providing food and Doctors Without Borders (MSF) is already on the ground with a mobile clinic.

Malaria is a major concern and the number of patients seen daily has increased from 70 to 250. With the looming fear of a cholera outbreak, MSF has been quick to drill two boreholes and are planning on drilling a third to improve the water supply.

The UN Children’s Fund, UNICEF, is putting up temporary latrines and washrooms to avert health disasters and has also provided two large tents where children can play and learn. UNFPA plans to work on maternal health. The Government of Malawi is considering reopening Luwani refugee camp, which previously hosted refugees from Mozambique during the civil war (1977 -1992), when over a million Mozambican refugees fled to neighbouring Malawi.

Malawi already hosts some 25,000 refugees mostly from the Great Lakes region in Dzaleka camp located some 35 kilometres from Lilongwe. This camp stretched to capacity and with food rations being reduced to 50 per cent since October last year, and the resources to assist refugees are limited.

Mozambique peace talks fail according to mediators

Mozambique News Reports/allAfrica

Mozambique: Mediators Say Talks Have Failed – Dhlakama & Nyusi Must Meet

Photo: Pernaca Sudhakaran/UN Photo

Mozambican boys playing with toy guns after peace was secured between the ruling Frelimo party and Renamo rebels in 1994. Boys of their age are now adults, but the two parties are back at odds with one another.

Disgusted mediators yesterday said the Renamo-government talks have failed.

Father Filipe Couto, speaking for all the mediators after the 104th session Monday, said “we lack the courage to admit that we do not have the energy to go forward and there is no chance to solve the problems.

“In this case, only two people have the solutions, namely, the President of Republic, Filipe Nyusi and the Renamo leader Afonso Dhlakama.”

In particular, “in these talks you will never reach agreement” on the military and demobilisation, he told the negotiators. The international observation team which was supposed to oversee demobilisation, EMOCHM, ends its mandate Friday and will leave the country.

“The creation of EMOCHM accomplished nothing,” Couto said.

He also said that removing parties from the state apparatus “is not a monopoly of Frelimo and Renamo” and “must be discussed by all the parties in parliament”, which includes the MDM. (AIM 11 May)

Mozambique – Renamo issues more threats of instability after autonomy bill blocked

Reuters

Mozambique opposition warns of instability after autonomy bill blocked

Wed May 6, 2015
Presidential Candidate Afonso Dhlakama of the Mozambican Resistance Movement (RENAMO) speaks to the media after voting in Maputo October 15, 2014. REUTERS/Grant Lee Neuenburg
 

By Manuel Mucari

MAPUTO (Reuters) – Mozambique’s main opposition party has warned of a growing risk of instability in the energy-rich nation after parliament rejected a bill that would have given it autonomous powers in regions where it has strong support.

Renamo, which lost fractious national elections in October, put a bill before parliament last week that would have given it rights to elect its own governors in six oil, gas and coal rich districts where it scored a majority at the polls.

However, the ruling Frelimo party voted against the measure, while the small opposition Mozambique Democratic Movement abstained, consigning Renamo to a resounding defeat.

“One thing is certain, the country is sitting on a barrel of gunpowder,” Renamo parliamentarian

Mozambique opposition warns of instability after autonomy bill blocked

Wed May 6, 2015 3:00pm GMT
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Presidential Candidate Afonso Dhlakama of the Mozambican Resistance Movement (RENAMO) speaks to the media after voting in Maputo October 15, 2014. REUTERS/Grant Lee Neuenburg
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By Manuel Mucari

MAPUTO (Reuters) – Mozambique’s main opposition party has warned of a growing risk of instability in the energy-rich nation after parliament rejected a bill that would have given it autonomous powers in regions where it has strong support.

Renamo, which lost fractious national elections in October, put a bill before parliament last week that would have given it rights to elect its own governors in six oil, gas and coal rich districts where it scored a majority at the polls.

However, the ruling Frelimo party voted against the measure, while the small opposition Mozambique Democratic Movement abstained, consigning Renamo to a resounding defeat.

“One thing is certain, the country is sitting on a barrel of gunpowder,” Renamo parliamentarian José Manteigas told Reuters on Wednesday, urging President Filipe Nyusi, who is a member of Frelimo, to intervene and revive the legislation.

Frelimo, a former Marxist liberation movement, fought a 16-year civil war against Renamo and there have been concerns that Mozambique could slip back into conflict after Renamo withdrew from the 1992 peace deal that ended the fighting.

In power since Mozambique won independence from Portugal in 1975, Frelimo dismissed suggestions that rejection of the bill would ignite violence.

“We don’t believe that Renamo would go against the will and desire of the Mozambican population, which is not a return to war, but peace and stability,” Frelimo lawmaker Damião José told Reuters.

President Nyusi agreed to debate decentralisation after Renamo parliamentarians had refused to take up their seats following the 2014 election, but signs of cracks in the fragile detente between the two main parties have begun to surface.

Manteigas said Renamo preferred a peaceful resolution to the problem, but warned darkly of “armed men in the bushes” if there was no change of heart.

ONE ROAD

The tensions threaten to disrupt plans by the southern African nation to revive its economy through its untapped natural gas reserves — some of the biggest in the world. The main energy hub is in the north of the country around Beira, Mozambique’s second largest city.

“Given that you have one main road travelling up from Maputo to Beira, it wouldn’t take much of a military presence to cause a disruption,” said political analyst Gary van Staden of NKC Independent Economists.

“Some investors see this man (Renamo leader Afonso Dhlakama) as having the capacity to cause widespread mayhem. He doesn’t, but they play into his hands by panicking,” van Staden added.

Mozambique’s economy grew 7.5 percent in 2014 with similar growth predicted for 2015, driven by the gas finds as well as strong performances in the agriculture and construction sectors.

In the two years leading up to the 2014 elections, Dhlakama’s armed Renamo partisans clashed sporadically with government troops and police.

Robert Besseling, an analyst at IHS Country Risk, believes Renamo is losing control over its armed forces and said calls for autonomy were a way to secure benefits for its veteran fighters, many of whom felt excluded from post-war development.

“If the negotiations fail to placate Renamo’s armed wing and ensure some form of demobilisation and integration, the outlook for violence will continue beyond 2015,” Besseling said.

told Reuters on Wednesday, urging President Filipe Nyusi, who is a member of Frelimo, to intervene and revive the legislation.

Frelimo, a former Marxist liberation movement, fought a 16-year civil war against Renamo and there have been concerns that Mozambique could slip back into conflict after Renamo withdrew from the 1992 peace deal that ended the fighting.

In power since Mozambique won independence from Portugal in 1975, Frelimo dismissed suggestions that rejection of the bill would ignite violence.

“We don’t believe that Renamo would go against the will and desire of the Mozambican population, which is not a return to war, but peace and stability,” Frelimo lawmaker Damião José told Reuters.

President Nyusi agreed to debate decentralisation after Renamo parliamentarians had refused to take up their seats following the 2014 election, but signs of cracks in the fragile detente between the two main parties have begun to surface.

Manteigas said Renamo preferred a peaceful resolution to the problem, but warned darkly of “armed men in the bushes” if there was no change of heart.

ONE ROAD

The tensions threaten to disrupt plans by the southern African nation to revive its economy through its untapped natural gas reserves — some of the biggest in the world. The main energy hub is in the north of the country around Beira, Mozambique’s second largest city.

“Given that you have one main road travelling up from Maputo to Beira, it wouldn’t take much of a military presence to cause a disruption,” said political analyst Gary van Staden of NKC Independent Economists.

“Some investors see this man (Renamo leader Afonso Dhlakama) as having the capacity to cause widespread mayhem. He doesn’t, but they play into his hands by panicking,” van Staden added.

Mozambique’s economy grew 7.5 percent in 2014 with similar growth predicted for 2015, driven by the gas finds as well as strong performances in the agriculture and construction sectors.

In the two years leading up to the 2014 elections, Dhlakama’s armed Renamo partisans clashed sporadically with government troops and police.

Robert Besseling, an analyst at IHS Country Risk, believes Renamo is losing control over its armed forces and said calls for autonomy were a way to secure benefits for its veteran fighters, many of whom felt excluded from post-war development.

“If the negotiations fail to placate Renamo’s armed wing and ensure some form of demobilisation and integration, the outlook for violence will continue beyond 2015,” Besseling said.

Mozambique – Dhlakama agrees to talks with government

AIM/AllAfrica
Maputo — Afonso Dhlakama, leader of Mozambique’s main opposition party, the former rebel movement Renamo, has changed his mind about dialogue with the government, and now wants more time for talks.

According to a report in Thursday’s issue of the independent daily “O Pais”, Dhlakama on Wednesday urged Renamo members not to embark on violence, and to give more time for the dialogue between the government and Renamo to continue until consensus is achieved.

He was speaking at the closing session of a meeting of the Renamo National Council, held at Dhlakama’s bush camp in Satunjira, in the central province of Sofala.

His position came as a surprise since, just two days earlier, at the opening of the meeting, Dhlakama had given the government an ultimatum of just a few days to conclude the dialogue successfully. On Monday, Dhlakama had declared “if by the end of next week, there is no consensus, I shall call my delegation to Satunjira, and I shall personally solve the problem”.

But on Wednesday Dhlakama said that, following his bellicose speech of Monday, he had come under pressure from members of the public, academics, religious figures and foreign and domestic investors to change tack. He was therefore proposing to the National Council that Renamo should be patient, and show confidence in its team at the dialogue, led by prominent Renamo parliamentarian. Saimone Macuiana.

Dhlakama took this relatively conciliatory position, despite a report from Macuiana which claimed that the government is not willing to yield on any of the questions raised by Renamo. Two months have passed, he said, and no consensus had yet been achieved on the first point on Renamo’s agenda, namely the amendment of the electoral legislation.

In the debate on this report, all the members of the Council who spoke, according to “O Pais”, declared that Renamo should give no more time to the dialogue.

Some made inflammatory speeches, which were strongly applauded, demanding that Renamo should not allow this year’s municipal and next year’s general elections to go ahead.

Although Dhlakama ignored the opinions of the Council on continuing the dialogue, he seemed to agree with them over the Renamo tactic of boycotting the municipal elections.
http://allafrica.com/stories/201308011440.html?aa_source=mf-hdlns